Author: andy place

Did you have chance to see the wonderful Sea Folk Sing Choir this weekend on your travels? If not or you would like to relive some of the moments again then please click here or on our newly created page that has just been added to our website.

On Sunday 11th November, to help commemorate the one hundreth anniversary of the end of World War One, Kent CRP organised a choir to sing on the Swail Rail Line from Sittingbourne to Sheerness on Sea.

Never Again by Kent composer Emily Peasgood was sung by Sea Folk Sing, 30 local singers who formed a community choir. They performed on the train platform at Sittingbourne, on the train travelling to Queenborough, on the bridge at Queenborough station and on the return train journey from Sheerness to Sittingbourne.  The music was heard by over 200 audience members and passengers as they went about their Sun afternoon journeys.

Composer Emily Peasgood says:
“Never Again is a thought-provoking piece. It transforms the audience to 100 years ago. It features tape recordings from the First World War to create an experience for visitors, while drawing parallels with the political climate today.”

 

On Saturday 10th November, Strood Station hosted our first choir event of the weekend. Never Again by Kent composer Emily Peasgood was sung by Sea Folk Sing, 30 local singers who formed a community choir. They performed on the train platform and in the underpass to Station Road. The music was heard by over 200 passengers as they went about their Sat afternoon journeys. The event was to help commemorate the one hundreth anniversary of the end of World War One.
Composer Emily Peasgood says:
“Never Again is a thought-provoking piece. It transforms the audience to 100 years ago. It features tape recordings from the First World War to create an experience for visitors, while drawing parallels with the political climate today.”

On a cold Sunday in October, a  group of willing volunteers braved the elements and planted over 3,500 crocus bulbs in support of World Polio Day 2018. The volunteers included those from the Maidstone Dawn Patrol and the Maidstone Riverside Rotary Club repectively. The purple crocus has become a symbol of the Rotary’s fight to end polio, as the colour purple represents the colour of the dye placed on a child’s finger to show they have been immunised against the disease. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will match Rotary’s commitment 2:1 so every £1 raised becomes £3.

We all look forward to seeing a blanket of purple crocuses adorning Maidstone Barracks in the spring time and helping to raise awareness for the eradication of Polio.

  

Kent CRP are delighted to announce that they were awarded The Community Art Scheme Award at the recent ACoRP Awards ceromony in Glasgow.The award was in recognition of the wonderful work that Bradfields Academy did in partnership with the British Transport Police, to raise awareness of the text 61016 campaign.